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Developing inhibitors of bromodomain-histone interactions

Abstract:

Lysine acetylation is a widespread protein post-translational modification that influences diverse cellular processes. An association between acetylation of histone N-terminal tails and transcriptional activation has been recognised since the 1960s. However, it has only become apparent since 2000 that many of the effects of histone acetylation are mediated by proteins that bind to acetyl-lysine through a specialised acetyl-lysine recognition domain, the bromodomain. Small-molecule inhibito...

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Institution:
University of Oxford
Oxford college:
St John's College
Department:
Mathematical,Physical & Life Sciences Division - Chemistry - Organic Chemistry

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Role:
Supervisor
Role:
Supervisor
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Funding agency for:
David Stephen Hewings
Publication date:
2014
Type of award:
DPhil
Level of award:
Doctoral
Awarding institution:
Oxford University, UK
URN:
uuid:7ee6647c-4ac7-41ba-9f15-dfd49de9f6c2
Local pid:
ora:8491

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