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Bipedality and hair loss in human evolution revisited: The impact of altitude and activity scheduling.

Abstract:

Bipedality evolved early in hominin evolution, and at some point was associated with hair loss over most of the body. One classic explanation (Wheeler 1984: J. Hum. Evol. 13, 91-98) was that these traits evolved to reduce heat overload when australopiths were foraging in more open tropical habitats where they were exposed to the direct effects of sunlight at midday. A recent critique of this model (Ruxton and Wilkinson 2011a: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 20965-20969) argued that it ignored...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

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Publisher copy:
10.1016/j.jhevol.2016.02.006

Authors


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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
MSD
Department:
Experimental Psychology
Role:
Author
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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
MSD
Department:
Experimental Psychology
Role:
Author
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Funding agency for:
Dunbar, R
Grant:
Advanced Investigator (295663
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Grant:
Advanced Investigator grant to RD under grant number 295663
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Grant:
FP7 Programme under grant number 288021
Publisher:
Elsevier Publisher's website
Journal:
Journal of Human Evolution Journal website
Volume:
94
Pages:
72-82
Publication date:
2016-01-01
Acceptance date:
2016-02-21
DOI:
EISSN:
1095-8606
ISSN:
0047-2484
Source identifiers:
618373
Language:
English
Keywords:
Pubs id:
pubs:618373
UUID:
uuid:6d2f2969-1492-46f2-8dc9-a05a7f2c9141
Local pid:
pubs:618373
Deposit date:
2016-07-04

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