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Journal article

Head movements quadruple the range of speeds encoded by the insect motion vision system in hawkmoths

Abstract:

Flying insects use compensatory head movements to stabilize gaze. Like other optokinetic responses, these movements can reduce image displacement, motion, and misalignment, and simplify the optic flow field. Because gaze is imperfectly stabilized in insects, we hypothesised that compensatory head movements serve to extend the range of velocities of self-motion that the visual system encodes. We tested this by measuring head movements in hawkmoths Hyles lineata responding to full-field visual ...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed
Version:
Accepted Manuscript

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Publisher copy:
10.1098/rspb.2017.1622

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Department:
Jesus College
Role:
Author
Publisher:
Royal Society Publisher's website
Journal:
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Journal website
Volume:
284
Issue:
1864
Pages:
Article: 20171622
Publication date:
2017-10-04
Acceptance date:
2017-08-30
DOI:
EISSN:
1471-2954
ISSN:
0962-8452
Pubs id:
pubs:730245
URN:
uri:e3896e78-4f75-4d06-8827-d7adef4dd817
UUID:
uuid:e3896e78-4f75-4d06-8827-d7adef4dd817
Local pid:
pubs:730245
Paper number:
1864

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