Journal article icon

Journal article

The mystery of "metal mouth" in chemotherapy

Abstract:

Of all the oral sensations that are experienced, “metallic” is one that is rarely reported in healthy participants. So why, then, do chemotherapy patients so frequently report that “metallic” sensations overpower and interfere with their enjoyment of food and drink? This side-effect of chemotherapy—often referred to (e.g., by patients) as “metal mouth”—can adversely affect their appetite, resulting in weight loss, which potentially endangers (or at the very least slows) their recovery. The et...

Expand abstract
Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

Actions


Access Document


Files:
Publisher copy:
10.1093/chemse/bjz076

Authors


More by this author
Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
MSD
Department:
Experimental Psychology
Oxford college:
Somerville College
Role:
Author
ORCID:
0000-0003-2111-072X
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Chemical Senses More from this journal
Volume:
45
Issue:
2
Pages:
73–84
Publication date:
2020-03-25
Acceptance date:
2019-12-09
DOI:
EISSN:
1464-3553
ISSN:
0379-864X
Language:
English
Keywords:
Pubs id:
pubs:1077011
UUID:
uuid:bf56172d-ea67-4880-8b45-d13fde173cd9
Local pid:
pubs:1077011
Source identifiers:
1077011
Deposit date:
2019-12-09

Terms of use


Views and Downloads






If you are the owner of this record, you can report an update to it here: Report update to this record

TO TOP