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Patronage, punch-ups, and polite correspondence: the radical background of James Woodhouse’s early poetry

Abstract:

In this essay, Adam Bridgen argues that the oft-condemned “sycophancy” of James Woodhouse’s early poetry is a misapprehension that overlooks the emergence of his evangelical, egalitarian beliefs in the mid-1760s. Reconsidering the letters between Woodhouse and his patrons reveals not only the influential friendships he cultivated as a plebeian poet but also the class prejudices he continued to encounter and resist, often forcefully. Although he conformed to a humble self-portrayal in his 1764...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed
Version:
Version of record

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Publisher copy:
10.1353/hlq.2017.0004

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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
Humanities Division
Department:
English Faculty
Oxford college:
Linacre College
Role:
Author
Publisher:
University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) Publisher's website
Journal:
Huntington Library Quarterly Journal website
Volume:
80
Issue:
1
Pages:
99–134
Publication date:
2017-03-01
Acceptance date:
2016-08-01
DOI:
EISSN:
1544-399X
ISSN:
0018-7895
Pubs id:
pubs:827127
URN:
uri:973ec36a-1615-422b-a7e7-c116ff14c0f2
UUID:
uuid:973ec36a-1615-422b-a7e7-c116ff14c0f2
Local pid:
pubs:827127

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