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Journal article

Is neurolaw conceptually confused?

Abstract:

In Minds, Brains, and Law, Michael Pardo and Dennis Patterson argue that current attempts to use neuroscience to inform the theory and practice of law founder because they are built on confused conceptual foundations. Proponents of neurolaw attribute to the brain or to its parts psychological properties that belong only to people; this mistake vitiates many of the claims they make. Once neurolaw is placed on a sounder conceptual footing, Pardo and Patterson claim, we will see that it...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

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Publisher copy:
10.1007/s10892-014-9168-z

Authors


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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
HUMS
Department:
Philosophy Faculty
Research group:
Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics
Role:
Author
More from this funder
Funding agency for:
Levy, N
Grant:
086041/Z/08/Z
Australian Research Council More from this funder
Publisher:
Springer Netherlands Publisher's website
Journal:
The Journal of Ethics Journal website
Volume:
18
Issue:
2
Pages:
171–185
Publication date:
2014-06-01
DOI:
EISSN:
1572-8609
ISSN:
1382-4554
Language:
English
Keywords:
Subjects:
UUID:
uuid:14a75110-6714-49be-a786-2b4b2cb3b0dc
Local pid:
ora:9776
Deposit date:
2015-01-21

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