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Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis

Abstract:

With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs) signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other impor...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

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Publisher copy:
10.1371/journal.pone.0010017

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Institution:
University of Oxford
Role:
Author
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Institution:
University of Oxford
Role:
Author
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Institution:
University of Oxford
Role:
Author
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Institution:
University of Oxford
Role:
Author
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Name:
Medical Research Council
Funding agency for:
Kwiatkowski, D
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Name:
International Atomic Energy Agency
Funding agency for:
Diakite, M
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Name:
Marie-Curie intra-European fellowship (FP6)
Funding agency for:
Campino, S
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Name:
Wellcome Trust
Funding agency for:
Fry, A
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Name:
Marie-Curie intra-European fellowship
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLoS One More from this journal
Volume:
5
Issue:
4
Article number:
e10017
Publication date:
2010-01-01
DOI:
EISSN:
1932-6203
ISSN:
1932-6203

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