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Destabilising decapitation in King Henry VI

Abstract:

In early modern England, state beheadings were carefully codified, reserved for the nobility and those convicted of treason. The highest and lowest in society were sentenced to beheading: those who headed the nation and those who threatened the head of the nation. Beheading was both a confirmation and an inscription of power: the publicly-staged state-mandated beheading inscribed the state’s power on the subject’s body, reducing the individual to a legible, mastered sign. The decapitated h...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed
Version:
Publisher's version

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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
Humanities Division
Department:
English Faculty
Oxford college:
St Cross College
Publisher:
University of Warwick Publisher's website
Journal:
Exchanges: The Warwick Research Journal Journal website
Volume:
4
Issue:
1
Pages:
45-60
Publication date:
2016-10-05
Acceptance date:
2016-08-26
ISSN:
2053-9665
Pubs id:
pubs:829027
URN:
uri:ee60901b-5c99-4b94-b2b7-02778e51d45a
UUID:
uuid:ee60901b-5c99-4b94-b2b7-02778e51d45a
Local pid:
pubs:829027

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