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Thesis

Madness, medicine, and religious identity in the nineteenth-century Atlantic world

Abstract:

This thesis explores the experience, interpretation and treatment of religious beliefs and behaviours that were considered ‘mad’ in nineteenth-century Britain and America. Challenging historiographical emphases upon a secularising transition in the long eighteenth century, it argues that there was considerable overlap between the religious beliefs and values of the people who were deemed religiously insane and the people who confined and treated them. Nevertheless, for various reasons—theo...

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Division:
HUMS
Department:
History Faculty
Department:
History Faculty
Role:
Author

Contributors

Department:
History Faculty / Wadham College, University of Oxford
Role:
Supervisor
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Name:
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
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Name:
Institute for Faith and Culture (in the Legacy of James M. Houston)
Type of award:
DPhil
Level of award:
Doctoral
Awarding institution:
University of Oxford

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