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Punishment as moral fortification and non-consensual neurointerventions

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, I defend and expand the Fortificationist Theory of Punishment (FTP). Second, I argue that this theory implies that non-consensual neurointerventions – interventions that act directly on one’s brain – are permissible. According to the FTP, punishment is justified as a way of ensuring that citizens who infringe their duty to demonstrate the reliability of their moral powers will thereafter be able to comply with it. I claim that the FTP ought to be e...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed
Version:
Publisher's version

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Publisher copy:
10.1007/s10982-018-09341-3

Authors


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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
Humanities Division
Department:
Philosophy
Society for Applied Philosophy More from this funder
Sir Richard Stapley Educational Trust More from this funder
Publisher:
Springer Netherlands Publisher's website
Journal:
Law and Philosophy Journal website
Volume:
38
Issue:
2
Pages:
149–167
Publication date:
2019-02-08
Acceptance date:
2018-12-06
DOI:
EISSN:
1573-0522
ISSN:
0167-5249
Pubs id:
pubs:952195
URN:
uri:a63990ea-58d8-4477-b06f-48292ee7eb09
UUID:
uuid:a63990ea-58d8-4477-b06f-48292ee7eb09
Local pid:
pubs:952195

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