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Synchrony as an adaptive mechanism for large-scale human social bonding

Abstract:

Humans have developed a number of specific mechanisms that allow us to maintain much larger social networks than would be expected given our brain size. For our primate cousins, social bonding is primarily supported using grooming, and the bonding effect this produces is primarily mechanistically underpinned by the release of endorphins (although other neurohormones are also likely to be involved). Given large group sizes and time budgeting constraints, grooming is not viable as the primary s...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

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Publisher copy:
10.1111/eth.12528

Authors


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Department:
St Annes College
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Department:
Oxford, MSD, Experimental Psychology
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Department:
Oxford, MSD, Experimental Psychology
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Grant:
Advanced Investigator Grant No. 295663 awarded toRD.
Publisher:
Blackwell Verlag Publisher's website
Journal:
Ethology Journal website
Volume:
122
Issue:
10
Pages:
779-789
Publication date:
2016-10-01
DOI:
EISSN:
1439-0310
ISSN:
0179-1613
Pubs id:
pubs:642354
URN:
uri:9211c42f-946c-49b0-90fd-41b524f28a7d
UUID:
uuid:9211c42f-946c-49b0-90fd-41b524f28a7d
Local pid:
pubs:642354

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