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Distance-decay effect in stone tool transport by wild chimpanzees.

Abstract:

Stone tool transport leaves long-lasting behavioural evidence in the landscape. However, it remains unknown how large-scale patterns of stone distribution emerge through undirected, short-term transport behaviours. One of the longest studied groups of stone-tool-using primates are the chimpanzees of the Taï National Park in Ivory Coast, West Africa. Using hammerstones left behind at chimpanzee Panda nut-cracking sites, we tested for a distance-decay effect, in which the weight of material dec...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

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Publisher copy:
10.1098/rspb.2016.1607

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More by this author
Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
Social Sciences Division
Department:
School of Archaeology; Archaeology Research Lab
Oxford college:
Keble College
ORCID:
0000-0003-2972-4742
Proffitt, T More by this author
More by this author
Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
Social Sciences Division
Department:
School of Archaeology; Archaeology Research Lab
Oxford college:
Green Templeton College
ORCID:
0000-0001-8234-7806
Wittig, RM More by this author
Max Planck Society More from this funder
Publisher:
Royal Society Publisher's website
Journal:
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Journal website
Volume:
283
Issue:
1845
Pages:
20161607
Publication date:
2016-12-05
Acceptance date:
2016-11-15
DOI:
EISSN:
1471-2954
ISSN:
0962-8452
Pubs id:
pubs:667502
URN:
uri:66ff9160-7a61-4ade-8e24-8ecbef9e0da0
UUID:
uuid:66ff9160-7a61-4ade-8e24-8ecbef9e0da0
Local pid:
pubs:667502

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