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Thesis

Characterisation of an “eat-me” signal on dying and HIV-1-infected T cells

Abstract:

The clearance of dying cells by phagocytes, termed efferocytosis, is regulated by a combination of “eat-me” and “don’t eat-me” signals expressed on the dying cell surface. Efferocytosis is essential for ontogeny and tissue homeostasis, but can also mediate the spread of pathogen infection, and its dysregulation leads to inflammatory disorders. The Sattentau laboratory recently reported that the macrophage efferocytic uptake of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells drives efficient infection of macro...

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Niloofar Karaji More by this author

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Role:
Supervisor
Role:
Supervisor
Type of award:
DPhil
Level of award:
Doctoral
Awarding institution:
University of Oxford

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