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Journal article

Prosocial preferences do not explain human cooperation in public-goods games.

Abstract:

It has become an accepted paradigm that humans have "prosocial preferences" that lead to higher levels of cooperation than those that would maximize their personal financial gain. However, the existence of prosocial preferences has been inferred post hoc from the results of economic games, rather than with direct experimental tests. Here, we test how behavior in a public-goods game is influenced by knowledge of the consequences of actions for other players. We found that (i) individuals coope...

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Publication status:
Published

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Publisher copy:
10.1073/pnas.1210960110

Authors


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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
MPLS
Department:
Zoology
Role:
Author
Journal:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America More from this journal
Volume:
110
Issue:
1
Pages:
216-221
Publication date:
2013-01-01
DOI:
EISSN:
1091-6490
ISSN:
0027-8424
Language:
English
Keywords:
Pubs id:
pubs:367754
UUID:
uuid:61a07b16-d877-4983-8d8d-90551b6c2ffc
Local pid:
pubs:367754
Source identifiers:
367754
Deposit date:
2013-11-16

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