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Rewriting the genealogy of minstrelsy for modernity: “Cry and sing, walk and rage, scream and dance”

Abstract:

W. E. B. Du Bois’s Dark Princess (1928) pointedly uses Spirituals and dandyism to interrogate cultural hierarchies. This essay highlights the shared genealogy between early twentieth-century African American writing and two bifurcating branches of nineteenth-century dandyism: the European tradition of Baudelaire and Wilde and the blackface tradition of the minstrel show. Tracing these lines of transmission reveals an unexamined embranchment of literary modernity’s family tree and demonstrates...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed
Version:
Publisher's version

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Publisher copy:
10.1353/afa.2015.0008

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Institution:
University of Oxford
Department:
Oxford, HUM, English Faculty
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press Publisher's website
Journal:
African American Review Journal website
Volume:
48
Issue:
1-2
Pages:
127-139
Publication date:
2015
DOI:
EISSN:
1945-6182
URN:
uuid:586e1fde-bd63-496b-ab93-174560ff1dbe
Source identifiers:
601688
Local pid:
pubs:601688

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