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Severe infections emerge from commensal bacteria by adaptive evolution

Abstract:

Bacteria responsible for the greatest global mortality colonize the human microbiota far more frequently than they cause severe infections. Whether mutation and selection among commensal bacteria are associated with infection is unknown. We investigated de novo mutation in 1163 Staphylococcus aureus genomes from 105 infected patients with nose colonization. We report that 72% of infections emerged from the nose, with infecting and nose-colonizing bacteria showing parallel adaptive differences...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Peer reviewed

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Publisher copy:
10.7554/eLife.30637.001

Authors


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Institution:
University of Oxford
Division:
MSD
Department:
NDM
Oxford college:
Wolfson College
Role:
Author
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Funding agency for:
Young, BC
Grant:
Research Training Fellow (101611/Z/13/Z
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Funding agency for:
Iqbal, Z
Grant:
Sir Henry Dale Fellow 102541/Z/13/Z
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Funding agency for:
Iqbal, Z
Grant:
Sir Henry Dale Fellow 102541/Z/13/Z
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Funding agency for:
Crook, DW
Grant:
Sir Henry Dale Fellow 101237/Z/13/Z
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Funding agency for:
Crook, DW
Grant:
Sir Henry Dale Fellow 101237/Z/13/Z
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Publisher:
eLife Sciences Publications Publisher's website
Journal:
eLife Journal website
Volume:
6
Article number:
e30637
Publication date:
2017-12-19
Acceptance date:
2017-12-02
DOI:
ISSN:
2050-084X
Source identifiers:
808731
Pubs id:
pubs:808731
UUID:
uuid:11ce86d6-b2c2-488d-9ff2-d45f1198e0a5
Local pid:
pubs:808731
Deposit date:
2017-12-04

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