ORA Thesis: "Correction of miscarriages of justice in New Zealand and England" - uuid:2dae4513-4fd2-40cd-bb6a-dbba696d6d7f

2764 views

644 downloads

Thesis

Links & Downloads

http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/ora:6368

Reference: Malcolm David Birdling, (2012). Correction of miscarriages of justice in New Zealand and England. DPhil. University of Oxford.

Citable link to this page: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:2dae4513-4fd2-40cd-bb6a-dbba696d6d7f
 
Title: Correction of miscarriages of justice in New Zealand and England

Abstract:

This thesis sets out to provide a deep analysis of the mechanisms for review of convictions in New Zealand and England after initial appeal rights are exhausted, and to identify the key areas of similarity and difference between these systems, the reasons for these differences, and their implications.

The appeal systems in each jurisdiction are briefly examined, alongside the pressures and restrictions on their functioning. Particular attention is paid to the options for appeal out of time, and for revisiting appeal decisions if new material comes to light.

The main discussion is of the specialist procedures for review of suspect convictions in each jurisdiction: the Royal Prerogative of Mercy process carried out by the New Zealand Ministry of Justice and the work of the English Criminal Cases Review Commission. This discussion presents the results of empirical research carried out by the author utilising the files of each of these bodies. It investigates the legal context in which each body functions, and provides an account of how each body functions in practice, by examining the circumstances in which each body will contemplate referring a matter back to an appeal court and the means by which a determination is made as to whether to do so in an individual case. In addition it examines the various factors (legal and non-legal) which impact on their work.

Finally, the key features of the two systems are contrasted, with a discussion of the areas of similarity and difference, as well as the possible implications of these, in particular for reform of the New Zealand processes.


Digital Origin:Born digital
Type of Award:DPhil
Level of Award:Doctoral
Awarding Institution: University of Oxford
About The Authors
institutionUniversity of Oxford
facultySocial Sciences Division - Faculty of Law
oxfordCollegeSt Catherine's College
fundingRhodes Trust
 
Contributors
Prof Andrew Ashworth More by this contributor
RoleSupervisor
 
Bibliographic Details
Issue Date: 2012
Copyright Date: 2012
Identifiers
Urn: uuid:2dae4513-4fd2-40cd-bb6a-dbba696d6d7f
Item Description
Relationships
Member of collection : ora:thesis
Alternate metadata formats
Rights
Copyright Holder: Malcolm Birdling
Access Condition: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/
Terms of Use: Click here for our Terms of Use